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ERIC Number: ED015376
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1965-Nov
Pages: 1
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
STRATEGIES FOR SELF-EDUCATION.
DILL, WILLIAM R.; AND OTHERS
SEVENTY YOUNG MANAGERS, FACING THE CHALLENGE OF SELF EDUCATION, WERE QUESTIONED ON THEIR AGENDAS AND STRATEGIES FOR LEARNING, AND THEIR CHANCES FOR SUCCESS IN LEARNING. EXECUTIVES FOUND DIFFICULTY IN DESCRIBING AGENDAS BECAUSE THEY LACKED TIME, OR PRACTICE, OR A SENSE OF PERSONAL IDENTITY. MAIN PRESSURES FOR SELF EDUCATION WERE TO QUALIFY FOR ADVANCEMENT, AND TO IMPROVE DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS. A FORMAL LEARNING APPROACH WAS FELT TO BE THE PRIMARY MEANS OF EDUCATION, BUT EXPERIENTIAL AND EXPLORATORY METHODS WERE SUGGESTED AS THE MOST APPROPRIATE FOR DEALING WITH UNFAMILIAR PROBLEMS. HOWEVER, CHOICE OF LEARNING APPROACH DID NOT VARY WITH THE NATURE OF THE PROBLEM, BUT WITH ABILITIES, PREFERENCES, AND EXPERIENCES OF THE MEN. GENERAL PRINCIPLES FOR SELF EDUCATION INCLUDED--(1) GOAL-ORIENTED STUDY, AND EVALUATION OF RESULTS, (2) A WILLINGNESS TO ACCEPT NEW MEANS OF PROBLEM SOLVING, AND (3) INTEGRATION OF NEW KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE. EMPLOYERS OFTEN HAMPERED SELF EDUCATION ATTEMPTS THROUGH INDIFFERENCE AND ANTAGONISM TO NEW IDEAS, AND INADEQUATE PROVISION FOR EDUCATION. FORMAL AND SELF EDUCATION WERE SEEN AS COMPLIMENTARY TO EACH OTHER. THIS ARTICLE APPEARED IN HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW, VOLUME 43, NUMBER 6, NOVEMBER, 1965. (PT)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A