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ERIC Number: ED014602
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1965-Oct
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
MIGRATORY WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES.
THE NEED FOR LARGE NUMBERS OF FARM WORKERS FOR SHORT PERIODS DURING THE CULTIVATION AND HARVESTING OF CROPS IN WIDELY SEPARATED AREAS RESULTS IN A MIGRATORY WORK FORCE OF APPROXIMATELY 400,000 PERSONS EACH YEAR. MIGRANTS ARE EMPLOYED TO AVOID LOSSES OF PERISHABLE CROPS IN THE FIELDS, TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF GOOD WEATHER OR TO FORESTALL LOSSES DUE TO BAD WEATHER, AND TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FAVORABLE MARKET CONDITIONS. WORKERS MIGRATE PRIMARILY FOR ECONOMIC REASONS AND WITHDRAW FROM THE MIGRATORY SYSTEM WHEN OPPORTUNITIES FOR STEADIER EMPLOYMENT BECOME AVAILABLE. OF THE 386,000 MIGRATORY WORKERS EMPLOYED IN 1964, NEARLY THREE-FOURTHS WERE MEN, AND THREE-FIFTHS OF THE TOTAL WERE UNDER 35 YEARS OF AGE. MIGRANTS WORKED AN AVERAGE OF 131 DAYS AT FARM AND NONFARM WORK AND EARNED AN AVERAGE OF $1,240 ANNUALLY. THREE PRINCIPAL MIGRATORY STREAMS EACH YEAR ARE THE EASTERN SEABOARD, THE MID-CONTINENT, AND THE WEST COAST. WORK CREWS ARE EITHER CENTERED AROUND ONE OR MORE FAMILIES OFTEN RELATED TO THE CREW LEADER OR COMPOSED OF UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS RECRUITED BY THE CREW LEADER. NO ONE PATTERN IS FOLLOWED BY MIGRANTS IN SCHEDULING WORK WITH EMPLOYERS. SOME LAWS AFFECTING MIGRANTS ARE THE MIGRANT HEALTH ACT, MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT, ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT, HOUSING ACT, AND FARM LABOR CONTRACTOR REGISTRATION ACT. THIS DOCUMENT APPEARED IN "FARM LABOR DEVELOPMENTS," OCTOBER 1965. (WB)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: ANNUAL WORKER PLAN