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ERIC Number: ED014544
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1965
Pages: 4
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD OF WORK. NUMBER 2, HIGH SCHOOLS.
BOTTUM, JOHN S.; TAYLOR, ROBERT E.
THERE ARE FEWER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR UNSKILLED AND SEMISKILLED PERSONS TODAY, AS MORE OCCUPATIONS REQUIRE SPECIALIZED TRAINING. SUFFICIENT OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES WOULD HELP TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM, AND HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OFFER ONE ALTERNATIVE. OTHER ALTERNATIVES ARE DISCUSSED IN VT 001 353, VT 001 355 - VT 001 358. IN 1963, 6 PERCENT OF THE 23,000 PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES OFFERED DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION, 7 PERCENT OFFERED TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, 36 PERCENT OFFERED VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE, 48 PERCENT OFFERED VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS, AND LESS THAN HALF OFFERED COURSES IN HOMEMAKING AND AGRICULTURE. THE TOTAL FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION WAS 308.9 MILLION DOLLARS WITH 18 PERCENT FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, 36 PERCENT FROM THE STATE, AND 46 PERCENT FROM LOCAL SOURCES. NO STATE IN THE NORTH CENTRAL REGION HAS A VERY HIGH PROPORTION OF SCHOOLS OFFERING A COMPLETE VOCATIONAL PROGRAM. STUDENTS IN VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS DEVOTE A PORTION OF THE DAY TO VOCATIONAL COURSES AND THE BALANCE TO ACADEMIC COURSES. GUIDANCE AND PLACEMENT SERVICES ARE GENERALLY PART OF THE PROGRAM. THE NUMBER OF PROGRAMS WHICH CAN BE OFFERED IS LIMITED BY THE AVAILABILITY OF INSTRUCTORS AND SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT, AND THE NUMBER OF INTERESTED STUDENTS. (EM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Ohio State Univ., Columbus.
Identifiers: N/A