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ERIC Number: ED013256
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Jan
Pages: 63
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS IN ENGLISH SYNTAX AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF SELECTED VARIABLES TO THE LEARNING CONCEPTS.
BLOUNT, NATHAN S.; AND OTHERS
THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER FOR LEARNING AND RE-EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN CONDUCTED AN EXPERIMENT IN THE SUMMER OF 1966 TO TEST AND IMPROVE ITS PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN STRUCTURAL AND TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR AND TO EXTEND KNOWLEDGE ABOUT CERTAIN VARIABLES RELATED TO EFFICIENCY OF LEARNING CONCEPTS--THE IQ LEVELS AND SEX OF STUDENTS, AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ADVANCED ORGANIZERS, REVIEW OF MATERIAL, NEGATIVE INSTANCES OF CONCEPTS, INFORMATIVE FEEDBACK, AND WRITING EXERCISES. FOR EACH PROGRAMED LESSON COMPLETED BY THE 48 PRE-EIGHTH GRADERS, TIME FOR COMPLETION AND PERCENTAGE OF ERRORS WERE RECORDED. RESULTS SHOWED THAT THE AVERAGE COMPLETION TIME OF A LESSON WAS WELL WITHIN THE LIMITS OF A CLASS PERIOD AND THAT, WITH AN ERROR RATE OF 7.3 PERCENT PER LESSON, THE MATERIAL WAS EFFECTIVELY LEARNED. MULTIPLE CHOICE AND COMPLETION TESTS MEASURED LEARNING PROGRESS. SEX AND IQ SHOWED HIGH AND CONSISTENT CORRELATIONS--FEMALES TENDED TO SCORE HIGHER ON TESTS THAN MALES, AND TEST RESULTS CLOSELY PARALLELED IQ LEVELS. THOSE STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED INFORMATIVE FEEDBACK AND WRITTEN EXERCISES SCORED CONSISTENTLY HIGHER ON TESTS THAN THOSE WHO DID NOT RECEIVE THESE AIDS. THEREFORE, INCORPORATION OF THESE TECHNIQUES IN THE USE OF THE PROGRAMED MATERIAL IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL SEEMS ADVISABLE. ON THE OTHER HAND, ADVANCED ORGANIZERS, REVIEWS, AND NEGATIVE INSTANCES OF CONCEPTS DID NOT CORRELATE SIGNIFICANTLY WITH TEST SCORES. (DL)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Research and Development Center for Learning and Re-Education.
Identifiers: MADISON; UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN; University of Wisconsin Madison