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ERIC Number: ED013168
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Aug
Pages: 54
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
SCHOOL DESEGREGATION IN BALTIMORE.
WALKER, DOLLIE; AND OTHERS
THE BALTIMORE CITY SCHOOLS IN 1956 ADOPTED AS SCHOOL POLICY THE SUPREME COURT DECISION ON SEGREGATION. THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO DESCRIBE WHAT HAS BEEN THE EFFECT OF THESE LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES AND (2) THE REASONS FOR FAILURE TO ATTAIN THE IDEALS OF THE LAW AND SCHOOL POLICY. A DESEGREGATED SCHOOL WAS DEFINED AS ONE CONTAINING AT LEAST 10 PERCENT NEGRO PUPILS AND NOT MORE THAN 90 PERCENT WHITE STUDENTS. THE METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES USED TO ASSESS THE DESEGREGATION PROBLEMS WERE (1) SUMMARY MEASURES, (2) PERCENTAGES, (3) PATTERNS OF CHANGE, AND (4) TO LOOK AT VARIOUS UNITS (SCHOOLS, STUDENTS) AS A FOCAL POINT. BOTH THE BALTIMORE CITY AND COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEMS HAVE MADE SOME PROGRESS TOWARD DESEGREGATION. MORE PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE BY PLACING NEGROES IN WHITE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS. FEW SCHOOLS ARE LEFT IN BALTIMORE WHICH ARE STILL SEGREGATED WHITE, DUE TO PRIVATE SCHOOL (PREDOMINANTLY WHITE) AND COUNTY LINE EFFECTS ON SEGREGATION. THE FUNDAMENTAL EXPLANATION FOR SEGREGATION OF SCHOOLS IS THE SEGREGATED NEIGHBORHOOD. WHEN NEGROES OR WHITES MOVE OUT OF A DESEGREGATED NEIGHBORHOOD, THEY TEND TO BE REPLACED BY NEGROES. (ES)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for the Study of Social Organization of Schools.
Identifiers: N/A