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ERIC Number: ED010727
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1966
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
WHY NOT GREEK.
SHRIVER, JOHN R.
BECAUSE A KNOWLEDGE OF CLASSICAL GREEK IS NECESSARY FOR UNDERSTANDING MODERN THOUGHT AND LITERATURE, IT SHOULD BE PART OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. A PROBLEM IS GETTING TEACHERS OF GREEK, AND PROBABLY MOST OF THE TEACHING SHOULD BE DONE BY COLLEGE PROFESSORS WHO TEACH THE HIGHLY MOTIVATED STUDENTS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. AN ELEMENTARY COURSE SHOULD BE ORGANIZED SO THAT THE STUDENT LEARNS GREEK ANALYTICALLY BY STUDYING NEW POINTS OF GRAMMAR ONLY AS THEY OCCUR IN THE LITERATURE HE READS. EVEN MORE IMPORTANT IS A "CULTURE COURSE" WITH LECTURES GIVEN BY TEACHERS FROM VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS, SUCH AS ART, HISTORY, AND PHILOSOPHY. GREEK MYTHOLOGY, GREEK RELIGION, GREEK LITERARY GENRES, AND GREEK SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ALL ARE MOST RELEVANT TO A STUDENT'S UNDERSTANDING OF "THE INTERRELATIONS AND UNITIES OF HIS OWN CULTURE BOTH IN SPACE AND TIME." SUCH A COURSE WOULD NOT NECESSITATE A KNOWLEDGE OF GREEK LANGUAGE. ALSO VALUABLE WOULD BE A COURSE IN GREEK (AND LATIN) ETYMOLOGY. FUNDAMENTALLY, HOWEVER, A COURSE IN GREEK THOUGHT AND LITERATURE WOULD SERVE TO EDUCATE A STUDENT RATHER THAN ONLY TRAIN HIM FOR A SPECIAL PROFESSION. THIS ARTICLE IS PUBLISHED IN "THE ARCH," VOLUME 13, NUMBER 2, WINTER ISSUE, 1966. (AS)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A