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ERIC Number: ED002825
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1960-Feb-25
Pages: 46
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS UNDERLYING THE EDUCABILITY OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILD. I. CONCEPT FORMATION AND TRANSPOSITION IN YOUNG MENTALLY RETARDED AND NORMAL CHILDREN.
BLUM, ABRAHAM H.; MARTIN, WILLIAM E.
REPORTED HERE IS A COMPARATIVE-DEVELOPMENTAL ANALYSIS OF TRANSPOSITION AND LEARNING IN YOUNG MENTALLY NORMAL AND MENTALLY SUBNORMAL CHILDREN. THE STUDY ATTEMPTED TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT AND NATURE OF THE LEARNING DEFICIT OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILD. TWO LEARNING TASKS WERE DEVISED TO PERMIT SAMPLING PERFORMANCE ON SUCCESSIVE SERIES OF DISCRIMINATION TASKS. TRANSFER OF LEARNING BETWEEN THE TWO TASKS WAS ASSESSED FOR THE MENTALLY NORMAL AND MENTALLY SUBNORMAL SUBJECTS. RESULTS WERE THEN CORRELATED WITH CHRONOLOGICAL AGE, NATURE OF THE STIMULUS, CUE, SEX, AND MENTAL GROUPINGS (NORMAL, FAMILIAL, AND MONGOLOID). ON THE FIRST TASK, AN ODDITY LEARNING TASK, A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE WAS OBSERVED AMONG TOTAL TRANSPOSITION SCORES OF THE THREE GROUPS. THE DIFFERENCE DISAPPEARED AFTER ADJUSTMENT OF MEAN DIFFERENCE IN MENTAL AGE. SCORES OF BOYS IN THE NORMAL AND FAMILIAL GROUPS WERE SUPERIOR TO SCORES OF GIRLS. THE REVERSE WAS OBSERVED IN THE MONGOLOID GROUP. THERE WAS NO DIFFERENCE BETWEEN NORMAL AND FAMILIAL GROUPS IN INCIDENCE OF TRANSPOSITION ON THE SECOND LEARNING TASK. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT DEFICITS OF FAMILIAL SUBNORMAL CHILDREN CAN PROBABLY ACCOUNT FOR THEIR MENTAL AGE. MONGOLOID CHILDREN EXPERIENCE DISCRIMINATION AND GENERALIZATION DEFICITS THAT CANNOT BE ATTRIBUTED TO MENTAL AGE. THE RESULTS SUPPORT THE BELIEF THAT LEARNING DEFICIT IS CRITICALLY RELATED TO THE ABILITY TO DIRECT AND MAINTAIN ATTENTION. (WN)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN.
Identifiers: INDIANA; Indiana (Indianapolis); LAFAYETTE; LEARNING OF MIDDLE SIZE TASK (LMST); Oddity Learning