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ERIC Number: ED001699
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: N/A
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
STAFFING AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES.
Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.
IN MANY AREAS WHERE TWO LANGUAGE GROUPS LIVE SIDE BY SIDE LARGE NUMBERS IN BOTH GROUPS TEND TO RESIST BECOMING ADEPT IN THE OTHER LANGUAGE DESPITE EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO DO SO. ONE POSSIBLE REASON FOR THE RESISTANCE TO BILINGUALISM MIGHT BE THE BELIEF HELD BY MANY THAT BILINGUALISM AND INTELLIGENCE HAVE A NEGATIVE CORRELATION. UNTIL RECENTLY, RESEARCH SUPPORTED THE CONCLUSION THAT THE MASTERY OF TWO LANGUAGES WAS MENTALLY CONFUSING AND THAT THIS CONFUSION RESULTED IN AN "INTELLECTUAL DEFICIT." A RECENT STUDY IN MONTREAL, HOWEVER, REACHED DIFFERENT CONCLUSIONS. THE MCGILL UNIVERSITY STUDY COMPARED TWO GROUPS, ONE MONOLINGUAL AND ONE BILINGUAL, OF 10 YEAR OLD CHILDREN FROM SIX FRENCH SCHOOLS. THE GROUPS WERE MATCHED BY SOCIOECONOMIC CLASS, SEX, AND AGE. THEY WERE SUBJECTED TO A WIDE VARIETY OF INTELLIGENCE TESTS AS WELL AS SEVERAL MEASURES OF ATTITUDE. THE BILINGUAL CHILDREN APPEARED MARKEDLY SUPERIOR IN BOTH VERBAL AND NONVERBAL INTELLIGENCE. THE BILINGUALS PRESENTED A GREATER MENTAL FLEXIBILITY, A SUPERIORITY IN ABSTRACT CONCEPT FORMATION, AND A MORE DIVERSIFIED SET OF MENTAL ABILITIES THAN DID THEIR MONOLINGUAL CLASSMATES. THE BILINGUAL CHILDREN ALSO EVIDENCED A MORE FRIENDLY ATTITUDE TOWARD THE PEOPLE WHOSE LANGUAGE THEY HAD LEARNED. THIS ARTICLE IS PUBLISHED IN THE "CARNEGIE CORPORATION OF NEW YORK QUARTERLY," VOLUME 11, NUMBER 2, APRIL 1963.
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.
Identifiers: New York (New York)